Showing posts with label Contra Costa District Attorney. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Contra Costa District Attorney. Show all posts

Bennett v. Collins

Case: Bennett v. Collins
7000-BENNETT Bennett v. Collins

Case Facts


Peter Bennett
PO Box 523
Alamo CA 94507
Telephone:       (925) 705-1812
Facsimile:        (000) 000-0000

In Pro Per




SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA-UNLIMITED JURISDICTION

Pete Bennett

                            Plaintiff,     
              v.

Gary Collins, and DOES 1-20, inclusive,

                            Defendants.

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CASE NO.: 

COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES FOR ASSAULT, BATTERY, FALSE IMPRISONMENT, TRESPASS TO REAL PROPERTY, TRESPASS TO PERSONAL PROPERTY, CONVERSION AND INTENTIONAL INFLICTION OF EMOTIONAL DISTRESS


           
Plaintiff alleges:
GENERAL ALLEGATIONS
1. Defendant Gary Collins is an individual.  Plaintiff Pete Bennett is informed and believes that, at all times herein mentioned, defendant Gary Collins was a resident of Contra Costa County, California.
2. Defendants Doe 1 through Doe 20, inclusive, are sued herein under fictitious names. Their true names and capacities are unknown to plaintiff. When their true names and capacities are ascertained, plaintiff will amend this complaint by inserting their true names and capacities herein.  Plaintiff is informed and believes and thereon alleges that each of the fictitiously named defendants is responsible in some manner for the occurrences herein alleged, and that plaintiff's damages as herein alleged were proximately caused by those defendants. Each reference in this complaint to ''defendant,'' ''defendants,'' or a specifically named defendant refers also to all defendants sued under fictitious names.
3. Plaintiff is informed and believes and thereon alleges that at all times herein mentioned each of the defendants, including all defendants sued under fictitious names, was the agent and employee of each of the remaining defendants, and in doing the things hereinafter alleged, was acting within the course and scope of this agency and employment.

FIRST CAUSE OF ACTION
(Assault)
4. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 3 this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
5. On or about September 21, 2004, defendant Gary Collins came to plaintiff Pete Bennett’s residence at 161 Valle Vista Drive in Danville, California.  Defendant Gary Collins menacingly approached and yelled threatening and offensive words at plaintiff, including threats of death and bodily harm.  Further, defendant Gary Collins attempted to strike and did, in fact, strike plaintiff, thereby inflicting bodily harm upon plaintiff.
6. In doing the acts as alleged above, defendant intended to cause plaintiff an apprehension of a harmful or an offensive contact with plaintiff's person.
7. As a result of defendant's acts as alleged above, plaintiff, in fact, was placed in great apprehension of a harmful contact with plaintiff's person.
8. At no time did plaintiff consent to any of the acts of defendant alleged above.
9. As a proximate result of the acts of defendant as alleged above, plaintiff suffered physical injuries to his elbow, shoulder, arm, knee, leg and chest.
10. As a proximate result of the acts of defendant as alleged above, plaintiff was hurt and injured in his health, strength, and activity, sustaining injury to his nervous system and person, all of which have caused, and continue to cause, plaintiff great mental, physical, and nervous pain and suffering.  As a result of these injuries, plaintiff has suffered general damages.
11. As a further proximate result of defendant's acts, plaintiff has been damaged in that he has been required to expend money and incur obligations for medical services and treatment reasonably required in the treatment and relief of the injuries herein alleged.
12. As a further proximate result of the acts of defendant, plaintiff has incurred medical and related expenses.
13. Plaintiff is informed and believes that, as a further proximate result of the acts of defendant, plaintiff will continue to incur medical and related expenses.
14. As a further proximate result of the acts of defendant, plaintiff was prevented from participating in his usual occupation and thereby lost earnings to his damage.
15. Plaintiff is informed and believes that, as a further proximate result of the acts of defendant, plaintiff's present and future earning capacity has been impaired.
16. The aforementioned conduct of defendant was willful and malicious and was intended to oppress and cause injury to plaintiff. Plaintiff is therefore entitled to an award of punitive damages.

SECOND CAUSE OF ACTION
(Battery)
17. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 3 and 8 through 16 of this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
18. On or about September 21, 2004, defendant Gary Collins came to plaintiff Pete Bennett’s residence at 161 Valle Vista Drive in Danville, California.  Defendant Gary Collins struck plaintiff with his hands on multiple occasions and threw plaintiff to the ground.  Defendant Gary Collins pinned plaintiff to the ground by pressing his knees into plaintiff’s chest while plaintiff was on his back on the ground. 
19. In doing the acts as alleged above, defendant acted with the intent to make a contact with plaintiff's person.

THIRD CAUSE OF ACTION
(False Imprisonment)
20. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 3 and 9 through 16 of this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
            21. On or about September 21, 2004, defendant Gary Collins used physical force and threats of violence, including death threats, to confine plaintiff for a period of time, against his will and without his consent.  Following this period of detention, defendant released plaintiff without charging him with any crime or taking him before a magistrate.
            22. Immediately prior to the acts of defendant herein alleged, plaintiff had been peacefully working in the study in his residence, located at 161 Valle Vista Drive in Danville, California.
            23. Plaintiff did not steal, nor was he in the process of stealing, any property belonging to defendant or anyone else, nor had he committed any crime against defendant or anyone else.
            24. In imprisoning plaintiff, defendant acted with deliberate malice and for the purpose of harassing plaintiff and causing plaintiff physical and emotional harm.

FOURTH CAUSE OF ACTION
(Trespass to Real Property)
25. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 3 and 9 through 16 of this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
26. On or about September 21, 2004, defendant Gary Collins intentionally entered a residence located at 161 Valle Vista Drive in Danville, California of which plaintiff is the occupant and possessor.
27. Plaintiff did not give defendant permission for the entry and, in fact, defendant entered plaintiff’s residence despite plaintiff’s explicit demands for defendant to leave.

FIFTH CAUSE OF ACTION
(Trespass to Personal Property)
28. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 3 of this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
29. On or about September 21, 2004, defendant Gary Collins, without plaintiff's consent, threw plaintiff into an antique table owned by plaintiff.
            30. In doing the acts above, defendant proximately caused damage to said table.  Plaintiff is informed and believes that the cost to replace or repair said table is approximately $400.00.
31. The aforementioned conduct of defendant was willful and malicious and was intended to oppress plaintiff. Plaintiff is therefore entitled to an award of punitive damages.

SIXTH CAUSE OF ACTION
(Conversion)
            32. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 3 of this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
            33. At all times herein mentioned, and in particular on or about September 21, 2004, plaintiff was, and still is, the owner and was, and still is, entitled to the possession of the following personal property, namely: an antique table. 
34. Plaintiff is informed and believes that on or about September 21, 2004 and at 161 Valle Vista Drive in Danville, California, the property described above had an approximate value of $400.00.
            35. On or about September 21, 2004, defendant Gary Collins, without plaintiff’s consent, intentionally damaged said antique table by throwing plaintiff into it, all to plaintiff’s detriment.
            36. The aforementioned conduct of defendant was willful and malicious and was intended to oppress plaintiff. Plaintiff is therefore entitled to an award of punitive damages.

SEVENTH CAUSE OF ACTION
(Intentional Infliction Emotional Distress)
37. Plaintiff incorporates paragraphs 1 through 36 of this Complaint as if the same were fully stated herein.
38.  Defendant’s actions of physically attacking plaintiff, verbally intimidating plaintiff, damaging plaintiff’s personal property and trespassing on plaintiff’s real property, as alleged in this Complaint, were knowing, intentional, and willful, and done with a reckless disregard of the probability of causing plaintiff emotional distress.
39.  As a proximate result of defendant’s conduct, as alleged in this complaint, plaintiff suffered severe mental anguish and emotional and physical distress, all to his general damages.
            40. In acting in the manner described in this Complaint, defendant’s conduct was malicious and oppressive, and was carried out in willful and conscious disregard of plaintiff’s rights and safety and subjected plaintiff to cruel and unjust hardship.
PRAYER FOR RELIEF
            WHEREFORE, plaintiff Pete Bennett demands against defendants, and each of them, as follows:
1. For general damages according to proof;
2. For medical and related expenses according to proof;
3. For lost earnings, past and future, according to proof;
4. For punitive damages;
5. For interest as allowed by law;
6. For costs of suit herein incurred; and
7. For such other and further relief as the court may deem proper.

Dated:                                                                        


                                                                                    ________________________
                                                                                    Peter Bennett
                                                                                    In Pro Per




The Murders







The Loretta Hale Murder

Nov 11 2011

The Bhatia case should be murder investigation, the Hale case was conveniently closed but should be reopened as on or about March/April 2014 an Alamo mom was found on the trails above Alamo with single gunshot wound to the temple which to me sound just like the SFPD Lester Garnier shooting from back in 1988 and my arson case in 2004 sounds like the bombing of the IRS Agents car in 1988 sent the investigators round file leaving them enough to run over and kill homeless for life insurance just like the LA Grandma's story.







The Roma Bhatia Case

Nov 12 2011

The Bhatia case should be murder investigation, the Hale case was conveniently closed but should be reopened as on or about March/April 2014 an Alamo mom was found on the trails above Alamo with single gunshot wound to the temple which to me sound just like the SFPD Lester Garnier shooting from back in 1988 and my arson case in 2004 sounds like the bombing of the IRS Agents car in 1988 sent the investigators round file leaving them enough to run over and kill homeless for life insurance just like the LA Grandma's story.







The Gary Vinson Collins

Nov 12 2011

The Bhatia case should be murder investigation, the Hale case was conveniently closed but should be reopened as on or about March/April 2014 an Alamo mom was found on the trails above Alamo with single gunshot wound to the temple which to me sound just like the SFPD Lester Garnier shooting from back in 1988 and my arson case in 2004 sounds like the bombing of the IRS Agents car in 1988 sent the investigators round file leaving them enough to run over and kill homeless for life insurance just like the LA Grandma's story.








THe Official Meeting

Nov 1 2011
Bennett/Nordoff/Bryden



During the Chief Bryden held in the office of Walnut Creek City Manager Ken Nordoff who heard my allegations that I'd been attacked again. This critical meeting set a benchmark linking The Danville Building Inspector Incident to CNET Arrests, but other incidents were raised that link to least one murder in San Ramon CA.

Within weeks Gary Vinson Collins was dead, along with two Danville Area Moms Roma Bhatia and Loretta Hale of Boy Scout PACK 36 who each died untimely deaths. I personally knew all three victims but Danville Police Officer Steven Tanabe and former Judge Golub were each members of PACK 36 Danville part of the Meridian Council.








Attack The Attorney

Nov 1 2005
Bennett's Attorney Attacked, Threatened and Beaten



The Danville Building Inspector Incident

One day I got a call from my counsel Sage Sepapi with news that he too had been beaten under nearly identical circumstances of ligation about to be brought against the Town of Danville. Within months my counsel went out of his way to get out of representation.

When Chris Butler's testimony against Stephen Tanabe oozed about insurance fraud, arson and other events it was clear as day that Police Officers and DA investigators had been lying to me for years and my collection of over 100 police reports were part of larger criminal operation coming within Contra Costa County.







The Racketeering Charges







Hobbs Act

Nov 11 2011

The arrests of officers began nearly seven years later in early 2011 when the California Department of Justice arrested Chris Butler and Commander Norman Wielsch, when thier faces appeared it was clear I'd been setup but the setup extends to the Bar Association, Contra Costa Superior Court, The Contra Costa District Attorneys offices and further to the municipal pooling authority where claims die with witnesses.

Learn more






The Contra Costa Bar Association

The Council of Judicial Review

Highlights
  • How the bar is controlled
  • The DIRTY DUI
  • The Rules of Court
  • Witness Murders

The personal experience from over 40 years of cases but one day I discovered witnesses in my cases were gone - then I found the truth - they were dead.

Learn more










Related Federal Cases


Highlights
  • How the bar is controlled
  • The DIRTY DUI
  • The Rules of Court
  • Witness Murders

Coming Soon

Learn more









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From the Penthouse to the Poorhouse

From the Penthouse to the Poorhouse

While traveling north on NB-680 after entering from El Cerro Blvd. when my truck burst into a ball of fire. The officer arrived on a motorcycle where I assumed I was talking to CHP. That was summer 2004 and then by summer 2011 my car was totaled in Lafayette CA during a hit and run.
There is no police reports on those nor many others.
Learn more
The NYC Penthouse
Cnetscandal.blogspot.com
This building was where my grand parents lived for decades, my grandfathers death was right after the Kennedy assassination. Much of the family history was stolen via a large police scandal involving the Contra Costa County Narcotics Taskforce, and Contra Costa District Attorney investigators which resulted in removal of District Attorney Mark Peterson from office after pleading guilty to Felony Perjury. 
The Suicide of the Diablo Cleaners
Cnetscandal.blogspot.com
In early 2004 was the starting point of the end of my marriage. There were all kinds of the people never seen before creating trouble, calling my clients and some went on to destroy my cabinet shop, software business and take my life then claim the Life Insurance, cash and inheritance.
My Client Sully -
Cnetscandal.blogspot.com
Sully once attended Community Presbyterian Church in Danville where we met where he heard I was building web databases. This was approximately late 2003 or early 2004. We met after service at the Waffle House.
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Who Killed Lisa Norell

Norrell Tragedy Unites Pittsburg Community
Within hours of Lisa's disappearance, community members came together to support each other. 

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Late on a November night last year, several days after she first reported to police that her 15-year-old daughter was missing, Minnie Norrell awoke from a fitful sleep and went to look outside her bedroom window.
There in her front yard, amid the many candles that well wishers carefully had placed and lit in her front walk, she saw a stranger.
She watched quietly as the man moved some of the shining candles aside to make room on the brick walls that line her front path for the one he had brought. He then lit the candle on the walk, which had become a symbol of hope for Norrell and her community, and disappeared into the darkness as silently as he had arrived.
“Pittsburg people are special,” said Norrell, nearly a year later, recalling those agonizing nights and the outpouring of public sympathy and support she felt. “I can’t tell you how many thousands of people were in this house. And I’m talking thousands.”
The tragedy of Lisa Diane Norrell’s disappearance and the news of her murder eight days later brought the community of Pittsburg together in fear and mourning like few other events in recent times, and has helped spark an effort by city officials and religious leaders to address problems of violence and youth alienation.
Lisa’s murder “heightened awareness of people and their surroundings,” said Mayor Federal Glover, 43, a lifetime resident of Pittsburg. “Emotionally it draws the community together. We all learned from the tragedy."
“She was a good person, who happened to find herself in the wrong place at the wrong time,” Glover went on. “Emotionally it makes you want to do more outreach.”
To that end, the city has held conferences on youth issues and set aside funding for a new teen center and skating park over the past year since Lisa’s killing, which remains unsolved. The city also holds open forums during city council meetings to promote dialogue between the teenagers and adults.
But one of the biggest changes since Lisa’s murder has been in the way Pittsburg officials discuss the problems of the city. According to Pittsburg’s Assistant City Manager, Glenn J. Valenzuela, 50, the city’s leaders were never so involved with young people as they are now.
“Involvement with the youth before Lisa’s death was a priority, but it was not at the front burner,” said Valenzuela. “Now, wherever you go in this city and hear elected officials speak, one of the first words that come out of their mouths is in support of young people. That is real rare in any city.”

Taking Comfort in Family
Pittsburg, a close-knit industrial town of 54,117, is located 40 miles east of San Francisco across the San Francisco Bay. Its hard-working residents are a diverse mix -- 47.2 percent Caucasian, 23.7 percent Hispanic, 17.1 percent African-American, and 11.2 percent Asian, according to the 1990 census. Many of its residents have lived all their lives in a town where Dow Chemical is one of the major employers along with a steel company called USS-POSCO.
They take comfort in their families, do the best they can to get by, and take pride in the city’s multi-ethnic character, which sharply contrasts with other, largely white, suburban towns in otherwise affluent Contra Costa County.
Indeed, at least one Pittsburg official, school board trustee Jim MacDonald, charges that local industries pollute the air and water more freely in Pittsburg than in other Bay Area communities precisely because of the city's working-class and ethnic makeup.
Earlier this month MacDonald proposed that the city demand that the Federal government declare Pittsburg "an environmental justice community." Such status, part of an environmental protection agency program begun five years ago to reduce the effects of pollution and toxic waste in poor and minority areas, would allow the government to oversee the industries and provide funding for education programs.
At first glance, Pittsburg, nestled next to the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, has a small-town feel, a safe haven from the problems of the major metropolis. But looks can be deceiving, for like many suburban towns across America Pittsburg is not immune from urban dangers: drugs, prostitution, youth gangs and violence among them. Lisa’s murder was one of at least six last year.
For some time, Pittsburg police have been at a loss about how to eliminate prostitution and the drug houses that became common sights on Ninth and Tenth streets. Gang warfare even began to claim lives.
One such death touched Father Ricardo Chavez enough to prompt him to do something about it. When a teenager named Douglas Askern was killed in a drive-by shooting only a few weeks before Lisa’s death, the town, numbed by the constant violence, did nothing.
“What got to me was that there was no reaction,” said Father Chavez, the priest at a local Catholic church who grew up in Pittsburg. “Nobody put a marker out there, nobody put up a flower or a cross. This was now the umpteenth death and I began to sense that everyone was like I was--you just expect it.”
Lisa Norrell’s murder soon followed, along with the deaths of several prostitutes from the area and brought hordes of Bay Area media attention to Pittsburg (See ETHICS). Finally, people were paying attention.
“The town just kind of adopted her, kind of like a strange phenomenon,” said Christine Rohde, one of Lisa’s teachers at Pittsburg High. “It was just this cute little girl who wouldn’t hurt a fly and all of a sudden she’s just gone. And violently and horribly.”

"A Wake-up Call to Residents"
In the aftermath of the killings, Father Chavez launched Families Against Violence, a group dedicated to teaching parents how to talk to their kids about violence. The city formed a task force in hopes of combating the problem and after school programs were instituted along with midnight basketball to help keep kids out of trouble.
Mark C. Leonard, 45, a resident of Pittsburg for six years, President of The Rotary Club and a member of the Board of Directors for the Chamber of Commerce and Boys and Girls Club, said that Pittsburg is no worse than any other city when it comes to crime. Still, he said Lisa’s killing has been a "wake-up call" for residents and police alike to do a more effective job at maintaining security.
“Personally, I don’t want my kids out after dark,” said Kathy C. Meidinger, Executive Assistant at the City Manager’s office and a mother of four. “And I preach to them ‘don’t put yourself in a compromising position,’ which is really what Lisa did. Just don’t walk alone in the dark.”
Lisa disappeared on Nov. 6, 1998 after leaving a rehearsal for a quinceaƱera party for a Latina girlfriend in an Antioch Hall. She reportedly left in anger and decided to walk home along the largely desolate Antioch-Pittsburg Highway. She never returned home. Her asphyxiated body, her hands knotted in fists, was found face down in the yard of a landscaping firm a week later.
It was a devastating time that council member Frank R. Quesada, 65, among many others in Pittsburg, will never forget. A retired postal worker, and Pittsburg’s mayor at the time of Lisa’s disappearance and murder, Quesada was an old family friend of Lisa and her family. Lisa’s 17-year-old brother Tony Quesada is Frank’s nephew by adoption.
“It was … heartbreaking,” said Quesada. “I saw her grow up. We would go to family functions and see each other. To me it was pretty personal, I knew her since she was a kid. The whole tragedy made you want to help the community.”
Like many, Quesada can’t make sense of the tragedy. He hopes the $60,000 reward money recently offered by Governor Gray Davis for information leading to arrest and conviction in the case will produce progress in solving a case that has seen little thus far.
“The funny thing, I don’t know what got her to be walking out there,” said Quesada. “It is not a heavily used road, people only used it for east-west traffic for work. Otherwise there is no traffic and no lights, it is very dark. I wouldn’t walk there and I am 65 years old. I know better.”
A statue of a fisherman adorns the Piazza di Isola delle Femmine on the Marina, representing the Pittsburg of the past, a predominantly Italian fishing community where Sicilians had come to make a better life in the early 1900’s. Originally named New York of the Pacific, the town became Black Diamond in 1905 after the discovery of coal in the hills just south of town. In 1911, residents voted to change the name to Pittsburg, after the Pennsylvania city, to reflect its industrial development. The “h” was dropped to simplify the spelling.
When commercial fishing in the bay and rivers was banned by the state legislature in the late 1950’s, the Italian community deteriorated and people began to move out. By then, an influx of people from all over the world had begun to call Pittsburg home and the population grew significantly. The largely Italian community began to give way to a new Latino population along with African-Americans and Filipinos. The change resulted in the exodus of many whites to neighboring Antioch, which consisted mostly of whites, as it does today.
In Pittsburg, the various races learned quickly to live with each other. “As far as I can remember, we got along well,” said Father Chavez. “It was such a small community that there weren’t really a lot of opportunities for doing wrong.”
Pittsburg saved its animosity for Antioch. For as long as residents can remember, there has been a rivalry between the two small towns that culminates in a raucous annual football game between their high schools each Fall.
“Antioch was our mortal enemy,” said Minnie Norrell, a graduate of Pittsburg High. “The Pittsburg-Antioch football game was the last of the year always. They had a lot of security out there because the funnest thing to do on Saturdays was to go to Antioch and start a fight.”

Remembering Lisa
These days, Minnie Norrell continues to mourn her daughter. The mention of Lisa’s name still brings tears to her eyes. But she is also doing what she can to find ways to better Pittsburg after the tragedy. She has been a vocal leader in seeking ways to bring new legislation so that children up to 16 years old will be considered missing instead of being automatically labeled as runaways.
She is also starting a non-profit organization called Lisa’s Closet to provide new clothes to needy children in the area.
And Norrell said she still takes great comfort in the citizens who have helped her cope, all the people who made a point to come to her and tell her how her daughter had touched their lives. She remembers the memorial for Lisa at the school, which drew over 2,000 students, many of whom were looking for ways to express their fear and grief. Norrell sat in the front row as Lisa’s teacher, Christine Rohde, gave a speech.
“It was very hard to speak looking at them because nobody knows what you’re going through until you look and see the pain in their eyes,” said Rohde. “Kids who didn’t even know Lisa just wanted to go up and hug her. She sat there for like two hours and just let kids come up and hug her.”
The children also remembered Lisa by decorating her locker with posters, cards and flowers. They held a candlelight vigil, walking from the high school to Norrell’s house, all the while singing Lisa’s favorite song, “Dreaming of You” by Selena. They crafted yellow ribbons and tissue paper flowers and gathered in Rohde’s room to weep and remember her.
Adults showered Norrell with gifts, flowers, constant visits, phone calls and the rapidly increasing collection of candles on her front walk, where so many strangers took the time to pay their respects.
Today, nearly a year later, a few candles still line Norrell’s front walk and a poster bearing a picture of Lisa remains in the front yard. Students from the high school stop by every once in a while and friends and neighbors still check in on her.
But for Minnie Norrell, who now lives alone in her modest corner house, things will never be the same.
“There is never going to be any closure. When they catch this guy and they kill him, I don’t have any closure,” she said. “My daughter is gone.”
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Ask Pete, his relatives committed suicide so did his girlfriend

Cover Image
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SUICIDE: A PROBLEM IN CONTRA COSTA?

Our Rate Is Higher Than the State's 
Suicide Prevention
Gerold Loenicker, Rhonda James, and Contra Costa Mental Health Director Steven Grolnic-McClurg present the Suicide Strategic Plan to Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors

A two-year effort to develop better policy for addressing suicide in Contra Costa County culminated with the release of the Suicide Prevention Strategic Plan this month. The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the plan September 10th, during National Suicide Prevention Week. Gerold Loenicker, Prevention and Early Intervention Program Supervisor, addressed  the board and said,  "In many cases, suicide may be preventable if primary care providers effectively screen individuals who are at risk, on a routine basis, and provide links to the right resources."

Loenicker co-chaired the Suicide Prevention Committee with Contra Costa Crisis Center director Rhonda James. The committee analyzed data provided by the Coroner's Office to identify at-risk populations, common methods of suicide, and how to improve delivery of crisis-support and prevention services. Recommendations in the plan include increasing coordination between county systems and community service providers to minimize obstacles to receiving help, improving protocols for assessment, triage and warm hand-offs of at-risk people, and training about warning signs and effective prevention practices for healthcare providers and community "gatekeepers" such as teachers and the clergy. The committee includes Behavioral Health Services, Contra Costa Regional Medical Center & Health Centers, Contra Costa Crisis Center, John Muir Health, Kaiser Permanente, and other community based organizations, health care providers, and public agencies.Funding for this plan was provided through the Mental Health Services Act. Contra Costa's suicide rate is 10.9 per 100,000 in population, higher than the state average of 10.3 per 100,000. 

A copy of the Suicide Prevention Strategic Plan can be found here: 


Two minute video on Suicide Prevention:  Suicide Prevention Tips

For more information contact: Gerold.Loenicker@hsd.cccounty.us

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The Superior Court Murders - The Death Docket

The Superior Court Murders 

How litigants, defendants, plaintiffs, witnesses, candidates, public officials, police officers and attorneys get whacked in one way or another.  

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LEGAL: Contra Costa County Supervisor Gayle Bishop

2000-04-04 04:00:00 PDT CONTRA COSTA -- In a surprising reversal, an appellate court agreed yesterday to rehear the case of former Contra Costa County Supervisor Gayle Bishop, who is attempting to overturn 1997 convictions for misuse of public office.
Without explanation, the state Court of Appeal granted a petition filed by Bishop's attorneys asking the court to decide whether Bishop was the victim of a political prosecution.
"We're delighted," said attorney Dennis Riordan. "Rehearing is probably granted in no more than one out of 500 to 1,000 cases. It is extraordinarily rare. It is very gratifying. It means these convictions have not been affirmed."
Last month, a three-judge panel dismissed two of four perjury convictions against Bishop and ordered a new sentencing hearing for the 61-year-old San Ramon Valley woman. And the justices seemed to suggest in their ruling that Bishop does not deserve a three-year prison term ordered by a visiting judge in 1998.
Bishop has long argued that criminal charges -- which included allegations her staff did campaign and legal work for her on county time -- were filed against her at the behest of political opponents who disagreed with her slow-growth development stance. She has also criticized the role the district attorney's office played in prosecuting her, saying it was a conflict of interest because she voted on its budget as a supervisor.

To avoid that conflict, Deputy District Attorney Jim Sepulveda prosecuted Bishop under a temporary assignment to the state attorney general's office. The appellate court called that arrangement a "charade" last month.
In papers filed last week, Bishop's attorneys argued that the lawyers who represented her at trial made a crucial error in not trying to have Sepulveda disqualified as prosecutor.
The appellate court made the same criticism in its ruling last month but noted that Bishop's appellate lawyers had not raised the issue, effectively preventing the justices from ruling on that point of law.
But in the new pleadings, her lawyers are arguing that Bishop had ineffective assistance from her trial counsel, and now the Court of Appeal will rehear her case.
"This means the court views the original opinion as raising new and complicated legal problems that it had not adequately considered before, the issue of the disqualification of the prosecutor," Riordan said.
Informed of the court's decision to re-examine the case, Sepulveda declined to comment. Ray Cardozo, the deputy attorney general handling the case did not return calls to The Chronicle.
Prosecutors have until April 21 to respond and then a new hearing date will be set
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A Trauma Collage

Hello, Daniel Horowitz!

There is sealed court order in a court case between Joseph Lynch and Contra Costa County payoff fund where they spend your money to jail your students and kidnapped my sons.  But wait there is more - they killed my relatives in Utah. 

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Action Action

The Suicide of Concord City Attorney Mark Coon - The Bennett / Coon Meeting in April 2012

I really liked Mark when we met, as they've said "One of the good guys", he was and his death was tragic, his kids will suffer, his widow will move forward.  The rest of us might survie the Battle of Giant REIT's who crave the barren lands of the Concord Naval Weapons Station.  Sale approved by Donald Rumsfeld who was in San Franciso a month or more after San Bruno Explosion on Sept 6th, 2010. 
 

Hello, Contra Costa County!

This is a template for a simple marketing or informational website. It includes a large callout called the hero unit and three supporting pieces of content. Use it as a starting point to create something more unique.

Sadest Tragic Self Destructing Career Moves ever

My personal connection to Wielsch wasn't obvious until someone in Concord reminded me about his fathers Nazi Prison Gaurd past.  Then I remembered how I knew Wielsch's - his father rented shop space a few doors down from shop on Cloverdale Ave Concord CA in 1981.
Butler emerged in the late 80s in the east county when he was an Antioch cop with Wielsch and Tanabe.  I met Officer Loius Lombardi with his gun drawn pointed at my head staying I was dealing drugs.  WTF
Action Action

Vultures via Culture

One day in 2010 or earlier friends revealed losses in real estate were sealed via a Bankruptcy. Later I learned it was Benny Chetcuti Jr. whose sister was married to Chirs Butler arrested in 2011 for stealing drugs siezed in drug raids via his pal Commander Normon Wielsch. W
Action Action

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